Will playing with my new born baby really help his or her brain development?

March 01, 2017 0 Comments


The answer to this is YES!

As new and improved technologies become available, more and more is understood about how a brain develops.

Neuroscientists now know that a human brain has approximately 100 billion neurons (brain cells); almost all of these are formed before birth and will last a lifetime. The number of neurons in the brain will stay roughly the same throughout life; however, connections (synapses) between these cells will increase tremendously to form a dense, intricate network to support brain function.

What’s interesting, is that a large majority of the connections between neurons form very rapidly during the first 2-3years of a child’s life as the child absorbs and experiences the world around them. During this time, a child’s brain will form far more connections than needed. Eventually, some of these early connections are naturally pruned away, unless they are strengthened through repeated stimulation.

As a parent/care giver, when you interact and play with your baby, you are helping to build those vital connections that support healthy brain development. Providing your baby with vast and varied stimulation within a caring, nurturing environment not only encourages these connections to form but also strengthens them to literally build the brain.

Providing your baby with vast and varied stimulation within a caring, nurturing environment not only encourages these connections to form but also strengthens them to literally build the brain.

Each time you talk, sing, read, touch and cuddle your precious little bundle of joy, signals are firing across connections to strengthen them and new connections are forming. In fact, any and all experiences are profoundly important for your baby’s brain development……and as with anything in life, variety is the key!


Written and owned by Pint-Sized Prodigy Incorporated Sources: Eriksson PS, Perfilieva E, Bjork-Eriksson T, Alborn A, Nordborg C, et all. Neurogenesis in the adult human hippocampus. Nature Medicine. 4, 1313-1317 (1998) Shore R. Rethinking the brain: new insights into early development. 1997, Families and Work Institute, 330 Seventh Avenue, New York 10001 Azevedo FA, Carvalho LR, Grinberg LT, Farfel JM, Fennetti RE, Leite RE, Jacob Filho W, Lent R, Herculano-Houzel S. Equal numbers of neuronal and nonneuronal cells make the human brain an isometrically scaled-up primate brain. J Comp Neurol. 2009 Apr 10; 513 (5) - 532.41

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